Essay in the Topic - Recruitment

2021-08-05 07:25:01
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1231 words
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Middlebury College
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Essay
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Recruitment is a process which equips an organization with equipped personnel to choose from. Recruitment can only be done through strategic and proper planning. Before recruitment takes place in an organization, there have to be proper staffing plans that are implemented as well as the forecasting approaches in the determination of the numbers of personnel required. Recruiting the right talent, at the right time and the right place requires strategic skills and practice as well as strategic planning. On a strategic perspective, recruitment looks at various traits and skills with respect to the labor market, labor laws, and competition and unemployment rates. Strategic recruitment will consider vocational skills and technical skills of the personnel involved.

When a job opening occurs or is advertised by an organization, what follows is applications and invitations to interviews where the organization human resource department will be keen to check on the required traits for the job opening. Other aspects that are considered are the graduate skills and employability. Graduate skills will have to deal with intellectual levels while the employability aspect caters for the leadership, communication skills, leadership and the attitude a recruit possesses towards working in the organization. The vocational skills include the professionalism of the recruits and their experience. The technical skills involve the knowledge of the recruits and their familiarity with different organization systems. Duties and responsibilities will have to be communicated strategically with a consideration of the organization culture and setting. Recruitment is a process which involves the acquisition of talent and also ensuring diversity in the workplace.

Bibliography

Breaugh, J.A., 2017. To Recruitment. The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of the Psychology of Recruitment, Selection and Employee Retention, p.12.

Q2. Systematic Training Cycle

The systematic raining cycle is important in an organization. The cycle depicts the outcome and stages of staffing in the organization.Systematic training cyle has a direct relationship to recruitment and selection. The systematic training cycle has four phases which revolve around in every aspect of an organization. The first phase is the analyses of needs which is done on the organization, individual and occupation level to determine the right kind of staffing and personnel. There has to be a reason to conduct the training in this step and has to exist between the different levels considered. Performance objectives and training objectives have to formulate. The design phase follows next where the concentration is emphasized on what knowledge is needed and how to learn. The design then introduces the number of employees to be involved in the cycle, the time of training, expertise levels of the trainers, consistency needed and the place for training. The training materials are also included in the phase. The third stage is the delivery stage and the implementation of the design. The deliver includes the on job delivery and off-job delivery. The delivery stage requires excellent skills from the trainers in ensuring the facilitation of the objectives of the training. After the delivery stage, the stage that follows in the cycle is the evaluation of the training which is very crucial. The evaluation indicates whether the objectives were achieved or not.

The information on the evaluation is then forwarded to the analyses stage and the cycle continues. The systematic training cycle plays an important role in recruitment. Recruitment depends on the evaluation stage for it to happen. If the evaluation stage gives a recommendation or pinpoints a gap in staffing then recruitment will happen in an organization. The selection is also affected by the systematic training cycle in the design and analysis stage. The selection of the recruits will have to be done in accordance with the objectives of the training.

Bibliography

Madson, M.B., Loignon, A.C. and Lane, C., 2009. Training in motivational interviewing: A systematic review. Journal of substance abuse treatment, 36(1), pp.101-109.

Q3.Kirkpatrick Four-Level Training Evaluations

The Kirkpatrick model of evaluation is known worldwide to provide crucial information when applied through training evaluations. The model puts into consideration the value of all training is it formal or informal. The model uses criteria involving four levels in the determination of aptitude of the training. The four levels include reaction, learning, behavior, and results. The information from the previous level forms the foundation of the next level. The subsequent levels provide ample and crucial information which tends to evaluate the usefulness of a training program.

Level 1: Reaction

The objective of the reaction level is to measure and evaluate the reaction of individuals to the training model that has been used. The reaction of individual can be through the use of questions by the trainees. The level tries to assess and evaluate whether the employees liked the training and their understanding levels of the same. The response of the participant is crucial as it enables the determination of how invested employees will become through the next level. The reaction level can be achieved through post-training questionnaires, written comments, verbal responses and printed reports.

Level 2: Learning

The evaluation at the learning level is gauges the extent to which the recruits or employees have progressed in mindset, knowledge and expertise. The level engages trainers and instructors executives in determining whether the objectives set out are met. The techniques involved in the level will include both informal and formal test. The tests will help in figuring out how the trainees have developed. The level introduces the use of control groups in order to compare the learning among individuals and teams in training. Kirkpatrick indicates that there needs to be a scoring process which should be distinct thus ensuring that inconsistent evaluation reports are reduced.

Level 3: Behaviors

The level as introduced by Kirkpatrick investigates and assesses the changes in the behavior of the employee due to the training involved. The level determines whether the skills and knowledge from the training are implemented in the workplace. The assessments are designed in around crucial specific key indicators of performance. The assessments can be performed through interviews and observations while the online assessment is very difficult.

Level 4: Results

The results level is the primary objective of the training program and determines the training model success. The process introduces management practices which are supposed to be linked to input in training. While assessing the results, it is important to consider external factors which can also contribute to the good performance of a poor performance. F0or the senior management, the appraisals and the achievements of key business objectives provide a better assessment at the level of result. It is also crucial to agree with the employees or trainees on the main objectives to be measured at the end of the training first before commencing on the program. The measure ensures that the employees understand what will be evaluated at the end of the training program and what is expected of them.

Bibliography

Lin, Y.T., Chen, S.C. and Chuang, H.T., 2011. The effect of organizational commitment on employee reactions to educational training: An evaluation using the Kirkpatrick four-level model. International Journal of Management, 28(3), p.926.

Bibliography

Breaugh, J.A., 2017. To Recruitment. The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of the Psychology of Recruitment, Selection and Employee Retention, p.12.

Lin, Y.T., Chen, S.C. and Chuang, H.T., 2011. The effect of organizational commitment on employee reactions to educational training: An evaluation using the Kirkpatrick four-level model. International Journal of Management, 28(3), p.926.

Madson, M.B., Loignon, A.C. and Lane, C., 2009. Training in motivational interviewing: A systematic review. Journal of substance abuse treatment, 36(1), pp.101-109.

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