God's Creation vs. Dr. Frankenstein's Creation. Essay Example.

2021-07-07 02:57:41
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Essay
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Victor Frankenstein, who is the protagonist of Mary Shelleys novel, Frankenstein, is depicted as a curious and a passionate individual in regards to his interest in performing scientific experiments. Victor becomes overwhelmed with the idea of creating natural life with the view that attempting to bring life with not be consequential. Nonetheless, the creation turns out differently as expected which makes Victor regret providing it with life (Jones, 2016). The analysis puts into view the similarities and differences between Dr. Frankenstein's creation process of his man (monster) in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and God's creation process of man (Adam and Eve) in the Bible in addition to the consequences of their respective creations.

One of the similarities between God's creation process of man (Adam and Eve) in the Bible and Dr. Frankenstein's creation process is the intention of creation whereby both God and Dr. Frankenstein wanted to provide life to man. Victor states, "What can stop the determined heart and resolved will of man?" (Shelley, 1994). In the Bible, God is perceived to create a being similar to him whereby he created man as per his image. The basic difference is that while God formed man out of nothingness, Dr. Frankenstein was giving life to a body that was already dead. Genesis 2: 7 states, Then the Lord God formed a man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being, (New International Version). Also, apart from bringing life, Victor is perceived to engage in the creation to attain a God-like status.

Another similarity between God's creation process of man (Adam and Eve) in the Bible and Dr. Frankenstein's creation process of his man involves the depiction of Adam. In the article, Frankenstein and Genesis, The Adam in All of Us, it is perceived that Victor takes the role of Adam (Word Press, 2011). Genesis 2 states, but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat from it you will certainly die, (New International Version). By giving life to the monster, various unfortunate events take place including the death of the family members of the doctor such that Victor later dies in solitude. The monster is viewed to be a metaphorical symbol of the apple in Adams story whereby his creation results in plenty of evil. A statement from Elizabeths letter to Victor states, Some soften feelings stole into my heart and dared to whisper paradisiacal dreams of love and joy, but the apple was already eaten, and the angels arm bared to drive me from all hope (Shelley, 1994). Victor could no longer lead a normal life after creating the monster; an aspect which is similar to Adam whereby his eyes opened and could be able to distinguish between good and evil. Furthermore, Victor realizes his mistake after the eyes of the monster are open (Word Press, 2011).

One major difference is the quality of the creator whereby Victor is considered a flawed creator which differentiate him from God as God is perfect. According to an article by Soyka, Victor Frankenstein is portrayed as "a version of the 'Creator' -- of God Himself, (Soyka, 2017). Soyka continues to explain that Victor is an imperfect creator whereby his short-sightedness and imprudence result in a creature who is filled with evil (Soyka, 2017). It is perceived that Shelley, using her depiction of the doctor, suggests that Gods haughtiness and the disinterest in his creation are what results in humans evil nature. However, this is not the case, since, despite evil entering the earth, God continues to play a significant role in mans life when compared to Victor who resorted to staying away from the monster. Soyka states, We might at first think of Adam and Eve's banishment from the Garden of Eden in Genesis 3, but this doesn't quite fit since God does not entirely abandon humanity to its own devices, as Frankenstein does the Monster, (Soyka, 2017).

Another significant difference between God's creation process of man (Adam and Eve) in the Bible and Dr. Frankenstein's creation of is the aspect of evil in creation. Evil is perceived to be integrated in the creation process in Frankenstein (Halpern et.al, 2016). Dr. Frankenstein is perceived to exhibit a dual metamorphic role whereby he both presumes the role of God as the creator and Satan as the destroyer of the creation by God (Soyka, 2017). The monster by Frankenstein is viewed to fill various roles regarding the fall of man (Adam and Eve eating the forbidden fruit) and Satan who seeks revenge for being thrown out of heaven. The monster also assumes the Job-like roles whereby he becomes a victim of circumstances that are beyond his control (Soyka, 2017). When compared to God, God uses goodness in his creation whereby after completing his creation, he views everything as good. Genesis 1:31 states, God saw all that he had made, and it was very good, (New International Version).

Another difference between God's creation process of man (Adam and Eve) in the Bible and Dr. Frankenstein's creation is on identification. Despite the assumption that the monster created by Victor is often referred to as Frankenstein, it was unnamed or rather Victor did not give it any name. However, in the story of creation in the Bible, God created a man and a woman who are identified as Adam and Eve.

As stated earlier, the analysis puts into view the similarities and differences between Dr. Frankenstein's creation process of his man (monster) in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and God's creation process of man (Adam and Eve) in the Bible in addition to the consequences of their respective creations. The similarities include the intention of creation whereby both God and Dr. Frankenstein wanted to provide life to man and the depiction of Adam. The differences include; the quality of the creator, the aspect of evil in creation and identification.

 

References

Halpern, M. K., Sadowski, J., Eschrich, J., Finn, E., & Guston, D. H. (2016). Stitching Together Creativity and Responsibility: Interpreting Frankenstein across Disciplines. Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society, 36(1), 49-57.

Jones, G. N. (2016). Romantic Literature and Contemporary Philosophy, Science, and Medicine: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (Doctoral dissertation). Undergraduate Research Scholars Program.

New International Version, Bible.

Shelley, M.W. (1994). Frankenstein, Or, The Modern Prometheus. 1st ed. [Ware, Hertfordshire, England]: [Wordsworth Editions].

Soyka, D. (2017). Frankenstein and the Miltonic Creation of Evil. Extrapolation, 33(2), 166-77. http://knarf.english.upenn.edu/Articles/soyka.html

Word Press. (2011). Frankenstein and Genesis, The Adam in All of Us. cmoylan2. Retrieved 7 November 2017, from https://cmoylan2.wordpress.com/2011/03/25/frankenstein-and-genesis-the-adam-in-all-of-us/

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